“Sarge”: Custom Illustrated Dog Book in PRINT! + A Quote for New Years

And so a new year has begun. Before I get carried away sharing my new projects that are already in full swing, I figured I better show you the things I was working on in December, first.

Perhaps you remember the book I said I was working on — the illustrated story about Sarge the farm dog? Here’s how it turned out!

custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton

cover

custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton

first pages

custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton about a farmer and his dog

random middle pages

custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton about a farmer and his dog

more random middle pages

custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton about a farmer and his dog

more random middle pages

custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton about a farmer and his dog

last pages

I used blurb.com for the printing, and I’m really happy with how it turned out! Their design software is easy to use and the website is informative, helpful, and full of options. (I highly recommend them if you’re ever looking to self-publish or print-on-demand). Best of all, I can order more copies whenever I want (so if you’re interested in buying one (or commissioning your own personalized book), let me know!).

EDIT: Enough people expressed interest in buying the book that I’ve put it up for sale here: http://www.blurb.com/b/7576769-sarge

Then there was this watercolor portrait I was asked to do:Commissioned Wedding portrait painted in watercolor by Jacque Oman Clinton

The above projects, plus a few orders for prints on Etsy, kept me plenty busy right up until Christmas. Then I spent the holiday week celebrating with family, relaxing with my husband, and enjoying the well-earned freedom of not needing to be “productive” (all while trying to recover from a germ that just WON’T go away). There was some re-watching of the Lord of the Rings, and a wee bit of jigsaw puzzle-ing, but mostly, there was the glorious luxury of sitting around in sweatpants, watching birds at the feeder, and doodling freely in my sketchbook for no purpose other than the sheer joy of it. Sigh…it was great.

bird blob doodle from sketchbook of Jacque Oman Clinton

bird blobs from sketchbook

And now I shall conclude with a bit of insight I picked up from author Anne Lamott in her book Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life. Though specifically aimed at writers, the following quote is helpful to all of us who are…you know…trying to live a life. May it give you the courage to face a new year and the many unknowns that lie ahead:

“E.L. Doctorow once said that ‘writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.” You don’t have to see where you’re going, you don’t have to see your destination or everything you will pass along the way. You just have to see two or three feet ahead of you. This is right up there with the best advice about writing, or life, I have ever heard.”

Nice, right? Whatever you may hope to accomplish in 2017, just remember…you don’t have to have it ALL planned out. Sometimes you just have to point yourself in the right direction and start moving, one day — one step — at a time.

So buckle up! 2017, here we come!custom made illustrated story book by Jacque Oman Clinton about a farmer and his dog

 

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The Timelessness of the Simple

While Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have been “debating” (bickering?) their lovely hearts out, I’ve been wrangling with an idealogical conflict of my own. For several days (more like weeks), now, I’ve been duking it out with myself over a great and formidable question:

“What to be for Halloween?”

Yes. It’s tough stuff.

After tossing aside my initial ideas, which included dressing up like Maid Marian (actually, I prefer Madam Cluck), Abraham Lincoln, and Captain Janeway from Star Trek, I decided to confine my ideas within the boundaries of a single theme. And, since I’m really a 5 year old (albeit an adult-sized one), the theme I chose was “iconic childhood characters.”

Characters like Madeline

The Man with the Yellow Hat (from “Curious George“)…

Charlie Brown

and Cookie Monster.

And let’s not forget our gaming friends like Pac-Man and Mario.

(I also considered the Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, a childhood staple that’s basically a character itself.)

And it was then that I noticed one of those happy truths about life:

It’s often the simplest of things that become the most timeless.

Madeline, Curious George, and Charlie Brown — they were drawn in such a simple style. The illustrations are wonderfully loose and sketchy, with just the essential details. And yet they remain memorable and dear from one generation to the next.

Cookie Monster? He’s a googley-eyed piece of carpet whose single fixation is yet another of life’s simple delights: the good old, tried-and-true chocolate chip cookie.

Pacman? He’s a circle with a mouth. He eats pixels.

And let’s not forget that Mario is just a humble plumber, fighting bad guys in world of cotton ball clouds and potted flowers. A genius concept? Not really. But wonderful, yes.

Which is all a roundabout way for me to get to the point I’m actually trying to make:

A full and splendid life doesn’t have to be a complicated life. And, in a similar vein, what you contribute to the world doesn’t have to be complex and heady in order to be of value. Memories are made from the smallest of moments: like standing barefoot in the shallows of Lake Itasca (the headwaters of the Mississippi, dontcha know), or eating Stove Top stuffing next to Uncle Joe every Thanksgiving. Art is made of lines and color. Hugs are made of arms and hearts. Life is made of days and minutes, and they’re all meaningful in their own right.

So in the age of “FOMO” (fear of missing out), I encourage you not to discount the simple things. Your life, your ideas, your creations…no matter how big or small… might just be what someone else needs to see in order to access the joy residing in their heart. Open your eyes, breathe deeply, and remember that life is good. Let yourself be moved by the simple things. Be curious. Share. Laugh. There is much to experience and savor, no matter who, what, or where you are.

(Here are my own simple contributions to entertain you this week. They’re little sketchbook tidbits, made in the cracks of time between other projects I’ve got going on (as always, stay tuned for more on that)…)

pen and ink illustration by Jacque Oman Clinton of a quail in a smoking jacket

Quail in a Smoking Jacket

quick apple sketches by Jacque Oman Clinton

apples!

Nothing amazing, but just the same, thanks for stopping by. Now go enjoy your weekends, y’all!

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Life at Life’s Pace

I seem to have entered a new and illuminating phase of young adulthood in which I’m constantly learning all sorts of obvious and handy lessons about “time”.

Particularly, I’ve had to learn and relearn with embarrassing regularity that things take as long as they take. I often forget that. No matter what “superfoods” I eat, no matter how much preparing and planning I do, no matter HOW much I wrack my brain trying to find a way — it’s simply unrealistic to think that I’ll ever figure out how to do all the things. (Especially since my list of  “things I want to do” seems to grow exponentially – See graph below:)

Things I Want to Do

I get cocky and try to make time operate against its nature, hoping that if I construct my lifestyle in a particular way, I’ll be so efficient and perfect that I’ll be able to bang things out and keep up with my runaway thoughts. There won’t be a list of “things I’m going to do next” because — BAM!– I’ll already be ON it. Things that take a long time WONT because I’ll be…simply amazing.

HAH. Yeah, right.

Of course, chasing that dumb fantasy makes me exhausted, bummed, extremely self-critical and — ironically — UNINTERESTED in doing ANYTHING. It quite effectively removes the joy from everything.

So forget it, I’ve got a new plan. I’ll try to find the pace that life — with all its inconsistencies and surprises and human foibles — deems appropriate. I’ll regard all-or-nothing thoughts like “I’m going to do ALL of ___(insert major project, enlightenment, or life achievement)___ on ____(insert day)___ !” as red flags marking the road to unhappiness/burnout. When I see them, I’ll choose a more mindful path —a path that honors the virtue of “keeping on keeping on”, not at rat-race speed, but at a one-foot-in-front-of-the-other tempo that allows life (and time) to operate how they will. And I’ll remember that always…ALWAYS!!!…I need to be patient.

This is fresh on my mind because this week, I finally started painting the walls of my new art studio. Earlier this month, my husband tore up the carpet and put some lovely laminate boards on the floor. Slowly, I’m getting closer to having my new work space up and running. But alas, despite my magical thinking, I didn’t paint my entire studio in one day. Instead, I painted some yesterday. And I painted some today. And I’ll probably paint some tomorrow. And that’s how it’s going to go.

img_2090

installing laminate flooring

painting the walls

painting the walls

And truthfully? I’m happy with that pace, because it left time and energy for lots of other good things. Things like playing with my niece, laughing with my family, baking apple cake, planning upcoming collaborative projects with people, reading good books, and watching the sky turn to Fall. And drawing candy corns, pretzels, and other happy things (of course).

ink and watercolor illustration of candy corn by Jacque Oman Clinton

watercolor and ink Candy Corn – in progress

Oktoberfest themed illustration by Jacque Oman Clinton

Oktoberfest snacks, anyone?

Bavarian Apple Torte - 'tis the season!

Bavarian Apple Torte – ’tis the season!

So it’s all good. And it’s all in good time.

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“Fantastical Beasts of Myth and Legend.” Plus, 7 Helpful Things for Artists and Humans.

So…this happened:

Fantastical Beasts of Myth and Legend

Seeking to revitalize my brain — which was feeling “cottony” after several days spent preparing pieces for upcoming shows, putting together a new website (which will be done, eventually…), and working on my latest acrylic painting — I took a paintbrush and dabbed a few blobs of watercolor on a page.

I intended to turn those blobs into cats. (Shocking, I know).

But of course, my plan was foiled. That yellow blob up in the top right corner insisted on becoming a stegosaurus, so the cat idea went out the window. Then that red thing became a unicorn butt. Before I knew it, a dim-witted dragon joined the fun, followed by an oh-so-cheery kraken of the sea . And then — holy moly! — there was Donald Trump.

Mer-Trump, to be exact.

Thereby demonstrating that creativity, like politics, is never a straightforward process.

In other news! Here are 7 things that I found helpful this week:

  1. This podcast Episode from Danielle Krysa over at the Jealous Curator, in which she interviews artist Aris Moore. Particularly helpful was Aris’s reminder that drawing is a worthy art form (painting isn’t the only “fine art”!), her observation that “To have people respond to what you’re doing is such a gift”, and her discussion with Danielle about how vulnerable we make ourselves when we share our artwork. “It’s such a sensitive thing to do, to put your work out there. Everything you make, it’s like the first time you’ve made it. You’ve never made it before. So you’re putting out something new, and something that you’re not sure of, ” says Aris, to which Kristina adds “You’re exposing your heart to the world and hoping that they do the best with it.” It’s so nice to know that other artists feel this way, too, and to feel strengthened by their resolve to SHARE THEIR WORK anyway.
  2. This article, from Carrie Lewis at the Empty Easel, titled “Advice for Artists Thinking About Giving Up”, in which she reminds us that it’s normal to feel like quitting sometimes, and that the feeling will pass. In the meantime, don’t make any rash decisions. Just because art never becomes “easy” doesn’t mean you should give it up. “Almost every one of the hundreds of paintings and drawings I’ve finished over the years has reached a crisis at some point. Either I messed something up, needed to make major changes halfway through, or simply got tired of it. Whatever the cause, the result was always the same: I wanted to quit! Of course, I didn’t…”
  3. These two artists I fell in love with on Saatchi this week: Lia Porto and Julie Hendriks
  4. Melissa Camara-Wilkins‘s recent blog post “Why You Aren’t Writing”, about overcoming the obstacles that keep you from writing/creating. “You’re worried that someone else is already doing the thing you want to do,” she says. “This is a real thing. Someone else already wrote it or did it or said it. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t…no one else can write it from your perspective. You know who you are, and you know what makes you different. That’s what we’re listening for. Write from the place that makes you, you. Write with your own voice, from your own experience, and help us see ourselves in your words. If you have something to say, it matters.” (obviously, this applies to the visual arts, too).
  5. Elizabeth Gilbert‘s quote (from Big Magic – READ THIS BOOK!) about taking action instead of waiting around for “inspiration” to strike: “…any motion whatsoever beats inertia, because Inspiration will always be drawn to motion.” 
  6. It’s rhubarb season! Strawberry rhubarb compote, anyone?
  7. Warm weather (finally!) and being able to have the windows open. Happy bird songs make the BEST background sound for painting.

 

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Thanks, Mom!

Mother’s Day might not be until Sunday, but hey, why not celebrate all weekend long?

After all, Moms. Are. The. BEST.

Words will never express how thankful I am for all the ways my mom has shaped my life. Sure, she raised me, fed me, clothed me, and made sure I survived past childhood; but she also went above and beyond to give me a childhood full of creativity and wonderment. It’s thanks to her, after all, that I am interested in art — she was helping me with creative projects before I was even speaking in full sentences. Her curiosity has always amazed and inspired me. She can’t help but pursue the things that interest her, and it seems like she’s always learning, experimenting, and making new things. Best of all, she shares what she learns, and has been an invaluable source of wisdom and support throughout my entire life.

Yes, that is me. And yes, I still make a mess when I paint.

Yes, that is me. And yes, I still make a mess when I paint.

When I was a kid, she was always willing to let me play with her art materials, even though I often made a mess of her studio. Whenever I was bored or curious, there she was, ready to help me channel my creativity into a new project. One project that was PARTICULARLY special to me was the “book illustrating” she helped me do in kindergarten. Throughout that year, she helped me write down stories that I came up with, and provided the materials for me to illustrate them. I’d bring them to school and read them to my class. I felt SO COOL!

A few years ago, she gave me a binder FULL of those very stories! She kept them all (that dear woman) and what a treasure they have become!

Looking through those old stories, I can’t help but notice that I’m still compelled to draw the same things I was back then — cats, fruit, nature, birds…

…and jars! Lovely, lovely jars, full of delightful things! Muffin the Puffin with Candy Jars(This is a page from the story “Muffin the Puffin”, about a Puffin who LOVES to eat gummy fish from the candy store. One day, of course, he eats too many of them and gets sick. So then he learns to eat REAL fish and decides, in the end, that they are just as good.)

I stumbled upon this old gem while I was taking a break from an illustration I was working on. An illustration that just happened to include:

JARS! Full of delightful little things!

Jars: Pickles, Fireflies, and Seashells

(Pickles, fireflies, and seashells, oh my!)

SO…THANKS MOM! — for all the support, wisdom, time, and camaraderie. Thanks for encouraging me to be myself, and for helping me pursue a life of artistic adventure. Thanks for the laughs, thanks for the cookies, thanks for listening, thanks for the love.

And thanks for the hugs, too. (My mom gives really, REALLY good hugs).

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Cat meets pineapple (illustration)

Through art, we grapple with life’s biggest questions. For instance: I woke up one day wondering “How would a cat interact with a pineapple?” So I got out my watercolors and began searching for an answer.Cat Meets Pineapple


In no time, the answer made itself clear. “Oh, right. That’s how,” I sighed, putting down my paintbrush.

What a relief to have gotten to the bottom of such a pressing matter.

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Happy Valentine’s Day! Here are some adorable animals in love…

Brace yourselves, I’m about to get sappy!

When I was in college, my (now) husband and I used to write letters to each other. Of course we also used our phones, Skype, and the occasional plane ticket to bridge the thousand-mile gap between us, but the letters we sent were of exceptional value. There was no established routine with our letter writing, no schedule. Rather, each one was a delightful, handwritten surprise, and I cherished them beyond measure.

Since then, we’ve “grown up” (whatever), gotten married, and moved twice, but the letters have stayed with us. They are precious artifacts that document a particular time in our ever-evolving journey through life together.

One of those letters was a doodle. (Actually, a lot of them were). For some reason, I still remember the afternoon that I made it. I found a sunny patch of floor in the attic of my college house and hid there, with a cup of tea, until I came up with this:

Original Animal TreeWe have it hanging on our wall now. I was looking at it a few weeks ago when I decided to make a fresher version of it to share with you all on Valentine’s day. (The original was NOT, however, a Valentine…in case you’re a stickler for the truth).

So here you have it. Version 2.0, complete with a romantical backstory for you all to enjoy (or be snarky about, whatever floats your boat). Share it with the people you love. Contact me if you want to buy it as a print. And most importantly, have a happy, heart-filled day.
Valentine Tree

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Portrait of the Mind in Winter

In an attempt to make light of my tiredness in winter, I illustrated some of the mundane thoughts that play on repeat through my half-hibernating mind each day.Portrait of the Mind in WinterMostly, though, I think this speaks for itself.

 

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